Beyond Immigration: ICE’s Massive Surveillance System Has Info on Most Americans, Report Says

Your information could end up in the hands of Immigration and Customs Enforcement when you apply for a driver’s license, drive on the roads or sign up for utilities, a new report found.

ICE has built a surveillance infrastructure that gives the agency access to data on most people living in the U.S. and has gone well beyond its immigration-enforcement duties to become a broader domestic surveillance agency, according to an investigation released by Georgetown Law’s Center on Privacy & Technology.

“Surveillance through the Department of Homeland Security is much broader than people realize. It is truly a dragnet,” said Dan Bateyko, co-author of the report, called “American Dragnet: Data-Driven Deportation in the 21st Century.”

Based on hundreds of Freedom of Information Act requests and a review of ICE spending transactions, the two-year investigation found:

ICE possesses driver’s license information of three in four adults living in the U.S.
At least a third of all adults’ driver’s licenses have been scanned by the agency with face recognition technology.
ICE can locate three in four adults through their utility records.
The agency tracks the movements of cars in cities that are home to nearly three in four adults.
“This information is personal data,” Bateyko said. “It’s very concerning because this has been done without congressional oversight, often without the awareness of state and local representatives.”

Report details how ICE avoids oversight

ICE has collected information on millions of Americans and immigrants largely without oversight by tapping private companies and local and state governments, including the department of motor vehicles in some states, the researchers concluded.

Report details how ICE avoids oversight
ICE has collected information on millions of Americans and immigrants largely without oversight by tapping private companies and local and state governments, including the department of motor vehicles in some states, the researchers concluded.

By Amanda Pérez Pintado
Read full article HERE

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