Immigration Stories from Atlanta Slated for New Book

Dania Karim, 17, a high school junior from Bangladesh, speaks about her immigration experience for “Green Card Youth Voices” at Cross Keys High School in Atlanta on Nov. 10, 2017. Green Card Voices is an immigrant advocacy group that is in town interviewing immigrant students for a book to be published in 2018. The book will be the fourth in a series so far from schools in different regions. (Photo: Rebecca Breyer / Special to the AJC)

The teen’s story was too compelling to be left on the cutting room floor.
She’d come to the United States from Guatemala earlier this year as a 15-year-old, her 4-month-old child in tow. She traveled to the U.S. border for months, mostly on foot, leaving behind a village with no electricity and little running water.

When it came time for the interview, she couldn’t get through it in English.

“We’ve never done this before,” said Tea Rozman Clark, offering to interview the teen and use subtitles to translate her story in the video being filmed.

Clark was winding down the last of four days of interviewing immigrant students at Cross Keys High School. The result will be “Green Card Youth Voices: Immigration Stories from an Atlanta High School,” a book she hopes will educate people across Georgia about the immigration process for some people in their own neighborhoods.

“Historically, every time there’s a ‘last wave’ of immigrants, they have a hard time of being accepted,” said Clark, executive director for Green Card Voices, a nonprofit out of Minneapolis that seeks to humanize recent immigrants through digital storytelling.

The situation is a personal one for Clark, who came to the United States from Yugoslavia as a 20-year-old and found it hard to connect with people in a community where diversity was little and she spoke no English.

“This is all about creating bridges where we can get to know one another,” she said.

The book will be the fourth in a series so far from schools in different regions. The purpose of regional books is to give readers reference points — schools, restaurants, a park — that are familiar to them to better connect with the experiences. Clark’s team interviewed several dozen students from more than 15 countries in an old chorus room at Cross Keys High School, in Atlanta near the Buford Highway corridor, where many immigrants live, work and socialize.

By Marlon A. Walker for MY AJC
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